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Upper GI Study Day

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Professor Lovat
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I would like to tell you a little about what we get up to and new things we have found out.

This week, I attended an Upper GI Study Day at St Thomas’ Hospital in London, right opposite Big Ben. Not only is the view from inside out wonderful, but the views I gained of what goes on inside were marvellous as well.

The study day was about benign oesophageal disease. We learned about the uses of the new high resolution manometry system for better understanding the causes of dysphagia (difficulty swallowing). It turns out that [link href="10"]achalasia[/link], a rare cause of dysphagia has a series of types which respond differently to different approaches. Before high resolution manometry, it was difficult to differentiate these. It is very much easier now.

I learned a great deal more but that will follow later…

Let me know if you have any questions.

[link href = "157"]Laurence[/link]

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9 Responses to “Upper GI Study Day”
    • Hi John
      Achalasia is is a motility disorder of the oesophagus. The lower two thirds of the oesophagus have a smooth muscle layer. At the very bottom of the oesophagus there is a valve called the lower oesophageal sphincter (LOS). In achalasia, the characteristic finding is incomplete LOS relaxation, increased tone of the sphincter, and lack of peristalsis of the oesophagus. This means that the smooth muscle coat which usually pushes food down the oesophagus no longer works properly. The important point to remember is that achalasia can only be diagnosed when other explanations like cancer or fibrosis (scarring) have been excluded.

      People suffering with achalasia usually have difficulty swallowing, regurgitation, and sometimes chest pain. The diagnosis is made using various tests including oesophageal manometry and barium swallow studies.

      If you want more information, read more here: http://www.answers.com/topic/achalasia#ixzz1l4U19KVT

    • Hi. Thanks for pointing out that we dont have a Facebook like button on the blog page. At the moment, you have to go to the Home page and you will see it there. Thanks for pointing the error out. I will try and rectify!

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