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What Can Colonoscopy Do For You?

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Professor Lovat
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Being a leading practice in gastroenterology, providing private colonoscopy in London we understand that the word colonoscopy may make you a little nervous. You may only know it as a procedure allowing doctors to examine the lining of your large intestines. While such a procedure may make you nervous, there are plenty of advantages to having a private colonoscopy. To set your minds at ease, we’re going to take a look at the myths and the facts of colonoscopy to see just what it can do for you.

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Myth 1- It will hurt

Many people are put off of a colonoscopy because they think it will be painful, this is not true. Although there may be a slight discomfort, for most of our patients a small amount of sedation is used. Though they are still conscious throughout the procedure, they are drowsy and have very little recollection of the procedure. Because we pride ourselves in providing the best possible comfort for our patients, we use Carbon Dioxide to inflate the colon instead of air. This is due to the body absorbing CO2 faster than air, reducing the patient’s risk of experiencing ‘trapped air’. To further make sure they are not in any pain, we routinely check our patients’ level of comfort throughout the procedure.

 

Myth 2- There could be complications

Complications during a colonoscopy are very rare, though some people believe it can cause bleeding, sedation-related complications and penetration of the colon lining. At Gastro London, we specialise in colonoscopies; our doctors have performed many colonoscopy treatments, and we ensure that all and any complications during the procedure do not occur.

 

Myth 3- A colonoscopy isn’t accurate

A colonoscopy is more sensitive to your body than an X-ray, and provides an immediate diagnosis of any issues found in your colon. That’s why it is one of the most sought-after procedures when trying to diagnose colon cancer, colonic polyps or investigating sudden changes in your bowel habits, and abdominal pains.

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Myth 4- You need to stay in hospital

A colonoscopy happens that very day, meaning once it is complete you are free to leave. If you have had sedatives, however, you will not be allowed to drive for the next 24 hours.

 

Myth 5- You don’t need a colonoscopy until you develop symptoms

A colonoscopy is used to investigate any abdominal pains and discomforts that would otherwise be missed by other investigative procedures. Normally a colonoscopy shows nothing more than a healthy colon; however, it can highlight some causes of your discomfort, such as colonic polyps. These growths can be found on the lining of your colon and don’t always pose an immediate threat. The smaller, most common polyp – hyperplastic polyp – can cause colon discomfort and, though it is non cancerous, it can become dangerous if left alone. The adenomatous polyp, however, is larger and carries a greater risk of becoming cancerous depending on its size and nature. The sooner we find the cause of your discomfort, the sooner we are able to treat it. Sometimes you may misjudge weight loss to the symptoms of a virus; this may not be the case if these last for longer than a few weeks. It’s always best to consult your GP for further advice, and they may refer you for a colonoscopy.

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If you believe you have experienced abdominal pains lasting longer than a few weeks, if you’ve seen a change in your bowel habits, if you’ve lost weight for no reason or if you’ve already been referred for a private colonoscopy and would like to know more about the procedure, please don’t hesitate to contact us on 020 7183 7965 and we’ll provide you with all the information you will need to make your procedure as comfortable and stress free as possible.

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